Battle of the Brands, otherwise known as the Super Bowl.

For sporting fans around the world this weekend saw the final of the Super Bowl, the annual NFL championship game which pits some of the biggest names in professional American football head to head in a bid to win the season. As the Super Bowl XLIX saw teams Seattle Seahawks and New England Patriots battle it out for the winning spot, here at OTB we couldn’t help but think the real winners were the brands which scored phenomenally in their Super Bowl bids for advertising. Aired around the world with the price for a 30 second advert weighing in at $4.5 million, these prestigious marketing slots were filled by some of the best known giants of the industry.

According to Marketing Week’s rolling coverage of the Super Bowl marketing frenzy, Coca-Cola’s #MakeItHappy advert was among the advertisements receiving the most engagement and was crowned the most watched video from this year’s Super Bowl line up. Well known for their high impact and inherently creative campaigns Coca Cola is a long-time favourite here at OTB, with the latest in the series proving highly successful at continuing the strong message of sharing and togetherness that so often lays at the centre of Coca Cola campaigns. With the tagline, ‘the world is what we make it’ and the an advert showing Coca Cola happiness spreading quite literally through the many cables and digital technologies that connect the world, the marketing kings have once again created a great component to continue their wider campaign.

Another clear winner of the Super Bowl marketing competition was Always, the P&G brand which has frequently caused a stir in recent years with its #LikeAGirl marketing campaign. In a sporting environment traditionally dominated not only by male participants but also male viewing audiences, Always have taken the opportunity provided by the enormity of the Super Bowl marketing spectacle to continue their promotion of positive attitudes towards girls and challenging the preconceptions of negative terminology, not only in a marketing context but beyond. In an interesting look at how brands used social media to bounce off one another and create a multi-faceted dialogue through Twitter, AdWeek claims that always received a healthy level of engagement with its promotion and picked up by the likes of brand giants McDonald’s to continue the increased levels of sharing.

Although the star of the show may have been the football, the value of the Super Bowl in marketing terms for creating audience participation and brand engagement internationally, virtually instantaneously, cannot be understated. Despite a number of debates surrounding the value of the investment in Super Bowl advertising as highlighted by The Washington Post, for the companies that can afford it there is no competition. With an estimated audience of 112 million viewers in the USA alone and experts calculating that the marketing investment averages at only 4 American cents per viewer, it is easy to see why multinational brands continue to buy in to the Super Bowl advertising frenzy.

Battle of the Brands, otherwise known as the Super Bowl.